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RubyGems, the apt-get for ruby   25 Sep 04
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Why do I love Debian? Coz of the package management system. Now Ruby has the same nice feature, called RubyGems

Install:

ruby install.rb
See what is available:
gem --remote --list
Search for the string Doom in descriptions:
gem --remote --search Doom
Install progressbar:
gem --remote --install progressbar

Now relax, have a good milkshake in the sun. A big big thanks to the developers: Rich Kilmer, Chad Fowler, David Black, Paul Brannan, Jim Weirch, Curt Hibbs, Gavin Sinclair, etc.

[ANN] rpa-base 0.1.0 "kitanai"   25 Sep 04
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(Source: Mauricio Fernandez)
 The Ruby Production Archive (RPA) will provide packages of Ruby
 libraries and programs in a form that allows production use, engineered
 through a stringent process resembling FreeBSD's or Debian's.

 rpa-base is a port/package manager designed to support RPA. Its scope and
 purposes are different to those of other systems like RubyGems.

 rpa-base 0.1.0 is now available on http://rpa-base.rubyforge.org .
 Please keep in mind that this is *not* a RPA release (that is, a release
 of the repository) but just a release of the rpa-base tool itself. We
 have provided several sample ports/packages for testing purposes, but
 they don't formally belong to RPA. Read below for information on the
 libs/apps packaged so far.

 rpa-base requires Ruby 1.8.1 (certainly 1.8 at least, it might work on
 1.8.0); it has been tested on several Linux distributions, FreeBSD and
 win32. We would appreciate feedback (both positive and negative) under
 those or any other architecture.

 It takes but a couple minutes to install and will allow you to do

 rpa install instiki ruvi

 ;-)
 (NOTE: ruvi, the cool pure-Ruby vim clone, won't work on win32)

 Features
 ========

 rpa-base is a port/package manager designed to support RPA's client-side
 package management. You can think of it as RPA's apt-get + dpkg. It
 features the following (working right now):

  * sane dependency management: rpa-base installs dependencies as needed,
    keeps track of reverse dependencies on uninstall, and will remove no
    longer needed dependencies
  * atomic (de)installs: operations on the local RPA installation are atomic
    transactions; the system has been designed to survive ruby crashes (OS
    crashes too on POSIX systems)
  * modular, extensible design: the 2-phase install is similar to FreeBSD and
    Debian's package creation; rpa-base packages need not be restricted
    to installing everything under a single directory ("1 package, 1 dir"
    paradigm)
  * rdoc integration: RDoc documentation for libraries is generated at install
    time (currently disabled on win32)
  * ri integration: ri data files are generated for all the libraries managed
    by RPA; you can access this information with ri-rpa (currently disabled on
    win32)
  * handling C extensions: if you have the required C toolchain, rpa-base can
    compile extensions as needed
  * unit testing: when a library is installed, its unit tests are run; the
    installation is canceled if they don't pass

Using SVG in Borges   25 Sep 04
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Interesting blog-entry on naseby + ruby + stuff. link

Using the right hammer ..   25 Sep 04
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(Source: Robert Martin (UncleBob) in the pragprog-list) As a contractor you must do the best job you can for your client. This includes picking the best language for the situation. I agree that there are situations in which Ruby might be the best technical solution, but the worst political solution. In that case, you cannot use Ruby — you must use a technically inferior, but politically preferable language. There are other situations — more and more of them — in which Ruby is politically acceptable, and technically superior.

[ANN] Ruby/.NET bridge R3   25 Sep 04
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(Benjamin Schroeder posted this to ruby-talk) I’d like to announce Release 3 of our Ruby/.NET bridge, which lets you use Ruby and .NET objects together in your programs. (Releases 1 and 2 were available on the RAA and RubyForge, but this is the first one we’re announcing widely.) link. Make sure you check out the 5 minute tutorial. It’s impressive.

The dark side of computing: floating point arithmetic   25 Sep 04
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I saw this post on ruby-talk: raise "false" if ((625.91 + 900.00 + 22.00) != 1547.91) And yes, of course it raises the exception in ruby or in C. Guy Decoux (as always) answered quickly:
 svg% ruby -e 'p  "%.24f" % (625.91 + 900.00 + 22.00)'
 "1547.909999999999854480847716"
 svg%

 svg% ruby -e 'p  "%.24f" % 1547.91'
 "1547.910000000000081854523160"
 svg%

Dave Thomas explained: It’s about 40 years old, and unlikely to be fixed. Floating point numbers are not represented exactly inside computers, and so floating point comparisons are routinely deprecated in books on programming. Certain values cannot ever be expressed in floating point representation. If you want exact, fractional, math, you should probably use the ‘rational’ library and investigate ‘mathn’. This is the classic article to read link What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic.

Michael Neumann added: In Ruby you can use BigDecimal:

 require 'bigdecimal'
 BigDecimal.new("625.91") + 900 + 22 == BigDecimal.new("1547.91") # => true

[ANN] celsoft.com/Battery 0.1.1   25 Sep 04
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(Souce: Sean O’Dell) Battery is a unit testing framework for Ruby. It captures all standard error and output and reports the entire summary of all tests formatted as valid YAML, for easier reading and parsing. Another key feature is that all tests run in the order they are added to their batteries, rather than arbitrarily. See the celsoft.com/Battery homepage for more information and documentation.

Homepage: battery.rubyforge.org/

Download: rubyforge.org/frs/?group_id=268&release_id=531

EuRuKo 2004   25 Sep 04
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European Ruby Conference 2004. New date: October 8 and 9 in Munich

Register

Come for some Ruby-fun. Last year’s conference: www.approximity.com/cgi-bin/europeRuby/tiki.cgi/

GNU Smalltalk 2.1e (Development)   25 Sep 04
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GNU Smalltalk is a free implementation of the Smalltalk-80 language.

Changes: Several bugfixes were made for the JIT compiler. A working Java-to-Smalltalk bytecode translator (which does not support networking and reflection yet) was added.

homepage download

Easy (better: familiar) things are most successful   25 Sep 04
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(Source: James A. Robertson) www.cincomsmalltalk.com/blog/blogView

 

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